Upcycling an evening dress into an Edwardian ball gown.

Knowing that I sew, more than a few people have given me bags of old dresses and clothes for me to rip apart and reuse the material. I love it, you never know what sort of fabric you might score, it’s like Christmas! However, I’m getting a huge pile of dresses in my closet all of which are intended for ‘cutting up one day’. The truth is my pile is getting a little out of hand!

Anyway, one of the dresses I had back there was my size, in colors I like, so I tried it on for kicks. Urgh. It has an empire waist which personally I think is the most hideous fashion ever. Sorry, not sorry. It also had thin little spaghetti straps. Not really a flattering look for me as I have broad shoulders and strong arms. 

 But then, wait! The general shape and cut was right, it just needed a little work and tada! Edwardian ball gown!

Usually, I hate wearing something I haven’t made completely. It’s not that I’m snobby (well, that much) but when you sew, everyone expects that everything you wear comes from your own hand, and I hate disappointing them by saying that ‘I didn’t actually make this’. Also, why wear something someone else made when usually I have so many ideas to make my own?

But is it always practical? A frugal budget can leave little room to afford yards and yards of new fabric every time you need a new gown. No shame there, that’s just being responsible. Also, I’ve wanted an Edwardian gown for some time now… but when I’m I ever going to get a good chance to wear one? Unless I throw my own party, none.  So why not upcycle an old dress into a new one?

Or, in this case, a new dress into an old one!

 

The dress before alteration. The under skirt is a very pale, creamy gold.

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Adding sleeves, just pinned down here. Sorry about the wrinkles, the chiffon scrap have been bundled in a bag for a month or two.

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The sleeves drape down the back, making the very distinct v-shaped back that you saw at this time.

 

…And a sash. The sash is cream colored, I tried a black and gold sash but the gold on it was too gold an clashed with the skirt. I think the cream gives it a very authentic look!

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Then I added some applique at the bottom of the cream/gold skirt. Normally ball gowns were heavily beaded but my patience doesn’t run towards beading for hours on end, so the appliques are sequined designs cut out of a remnant and sewn on. Good enough for me.

 

And done!

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Yeah, still a mass of wrinkles!

In barely an hour, I added a complete, new historical dress to my wardrobe, how fantastic is that??

Historical accuracy: Well, the general shape is good, we won’t discuss the fabric, or zipper placement.

Cost: Dress -free, Sash-free, Chiffon for sleeves- 2 small folded squares from a MASSIVE length of chiffon I bought cheap earlier this year. Let’s say $1?  Other expenses sequined applique cut from remnant fabric from Joann’s, two black glass beads for the points of the sleeves. Both remnant fabric and beads were bought for other projects a while ago and I used barely any, so yes, I bought them, but it hardly counts. Let’s say $2?

Still need: Full length black gloves. Pick up from a Halloween store next month. I really need a period corset, the Edwardian shape is very distinctive. However, since I really have no place to wear this, the time and money it would take to make a proper Edwardian corset really isn’t practical, or high on my list of things to do. Eventually!

 

I have a lot more dresses, so consider this the first in my Upcycling series. This was definitely the easiest one, the rest should be a bit more tricky!

Querying Again!

Hello! It’s been forever and a day since I last posted! I’ve been so busy the last few months, I’ve vended at several more shows, I’ve taken up a new hobby (wood burning), I’ve taught at several dance camps, and, most importantly, I’ve finished my current manuscript!

That’s right people, I am once more facing the daunting task of querying agents.

Basically, my book has been completely rewritten. But the biggest change I made was to cut it in half. At its initial completion it weighed in at 117K words. Now, I don’t think that’s huge, I prefer to read big books, but we all know how it goes. As an unpublished writer, I knew I had to knock that word count down. By the time I was querying the first time around the word count was hovering a little over 105K words. ‘Too long’ No takers. (for which I am actually glad, my book was so much less than it could have been)

I took a big step back and thought about this for a long time. What was really frustrating me was that there was so much more I wanted to add, which was going to send my word count soaring!

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Cut that sucker in half and went to town rewriting. Best. Decision. Ever.

Moral here? Don’t be afraid to make the big changes to your book. My word count is now 93K which fits perfectly in the suggested word counts for YA High Fantasy.

Anyway, it’s currently being read by my mom in an attempt to get useful feedback before I thrust it under the critiquing eye of an agent. I’m not going to look at it, I’m not even going to think about it, for at least a week. Then I’ll take the feedback and reread through the entire thing one more time.

And then I query.

Now, I can’t wait to share some pictures of the shows I’ve worked at and of the stuff I’ve been making, but quite frankly, I’ve been editing for a month straight, I can’t stare at a computer screen any more! I’m going to go read, work on some art, maybe do a stretching session, anything but stare at the computer. And tomorrow I’ll be back, promise!